What is Travertine? History of Architecture
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What is travertine?

Travertine
The travertine is the white stone in between the bricks
(This is from the Colosseum in Rome)

August 2016 - Travertine is a kind of sedimentary stone that is common in Italy. Like marble, travertine is a form of limestone. When limestone is put under a lot of pressure for a long time (thousands of years), it can turn into travertine, the way peat turns into coal. If the travertine is left under pressure for thousands more years, it can turn into marble, the way carbon can turn into diamonds. So travertine is a kind of stone that is about halfway in between limestone and marble. Travertine is finer than limestone, but not as fine as marble.

The Romans used travertine on the main parts of buildings where it was too expensive to use marble. Often, for instance, the steps might be made of travertine while the columns or sculptures were made of marble. We do the same thing today.

Some examples of buildings in travertine are the Colosseum in Rome, or the baptistry at Pisa.

Bibliography and further reading:

Houses, Villas, and Palaces in the Roman World, by Alexander McKay (reprinted 1998). A standard text on Roman houses.

Limestone
Marble
Tufa
Basalt
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Professor Carr

Karen Eva Carr, PhD.
Assoc. Professor Emerita, History
Portland State University

Professor Carr holds a B.A. with high honors from Cornell University in classics and archaeology, and her M.A. and PhD. from the University of Michigan in Classical Art and Archaeology. She has excavated in Scotland, Cyprus, Greece, Israel, and Tunisia, and she has been teaching history to university students for a very long time.

Professor Carr's PSU page

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